Agriculture

Track 5: Beekeeping

Producing honeybees and local honey is a great way to diversify most any farm. Join Michael Shamblin, WVU Extension Service Agent Clay County and Wade Stiltner, West Virginia Department of Agriculture (WVDA) State Apiarist, for an introduction to beekeeping. Michael and Wade will cover biology, equipment and techniques for keeping this fascinating insect.

Instructors: Michael Shamblin, WVU Extension Service and Wade Stiltner, WV Dept. of Agriculture State Apiarist

Courses offered within this track

The Colony and It’s Natural Organization/Bee Keeping Equipment and Establishing Colonies

Session 1: 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Presenters: Michael Shamblin and Wade Stiltner

Michael Shamblin, WVU Extension Service Clay County, Agriculture and Natural Resources Extension Agent, Michael.Shamblin@mail.wvu.edu. Michael is a graduate of West Virginia University, receiving his Bachelors of Science in Agriculture in 2001 and Masters of Science in Agriculture Education in 2002. Michael became a beekeeper in 1999 when encouraged by his friend and late colleague Tom McCutcheon, then WVU Extension Agent in Roane County. Tom gave Michael his first bees and his only request in return was that he start someone else. “During the last 15 years, I’ve spoken to “wanna-bee” beekeepers around the state”, said Michael. “I hope I’ve paid Tom for the bees by now”. Michael remains a hobby beekeeper and gardener at his home in Looneyville WV with his wife and 3 children. He has served as the WVU Extension Agent in Clay County for the past 10 years.

Wade Stiltner, WV Department of Agriculture, State Apiarist, wstiltner@wvda.us. Wade grew up in Wayne County WV and attended Buffalo High School. He was an officer in FFA for 4 years. Beekeeping was one of my projects since I lived on a rural small farm we had most all the other farm animals. After graduation I begin working in a lumber mill, got married (41 years) we had 2 children after 7 years at the mill I then went to work underground in the coal mines of eastern KY. Still keeping bees pre-mite era! During that period I was moving from place to place in the coal fields I sold my bees mid-80,s. After I finally settled down and bought my present farm I got bees again. I had to now learn to deal with the mites and to keep bees in good health to produce honey! After 23 years in the mines I went to construction for a few years then went to work part time for the WVDA in the apiary program that was in 2000 until today. I keep around 200 colonies at the present time and still trying to maintain healthy bees.


Colony Management/Colony Divisions and Swarm Collection

Session 2: 1:15 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Presenters: Michael Shamblin and Wade Stiltner

Michael Shamblin, WVU Extension Service Clay County, Agriculture and Natural Resources Extension Agent, Michael.Shamblin@mail.wvu.edu. Michael is a graduate of West Virginia University, receiving his Bachelors of Science in Agriculture in 2001 and Masters of Science in Agriculture Education in 2002. Michael became a beekeeper in 1999 when encouraged by his friend and late colleague Tom McCutcheon, then WVU Extension Agent in Roane County. Tom gave Michael his first bees and his only request in return was that he start someone else. “During the last 15 years, I’ve spoken to “wanna-bee” beekeepers around the state”, said Michael. “I hope I’ve paid Tom for the bees by now”. Michael remains a hobby beekeeper and gardener at his home in Looneyville WV with his wife and 3 children. He has served as the WVU Extension Agent in Clay County for the past 10 years.

Wade Stiltner, WV Department of Agriculture, State Apiarist, wstiltner@wvda.us. Wade grew up in Wayne County WV and attended Buffalo High School. He was an officer in FFA for 4 years. Beekeeping was one of my projects since I lived on a rural small farm we had most all the other farm animals. After graduation I begin working in a lumber mill, got married (41 years) we had 2 children after 7 years at the mill I then went to work underground in the coal mines of eastern KY. Still keeping bees pre-mite era! During that period I was moving from place to place in the coal fields I sold my bees mid-80,s. After I finally settled down and bought my present farm I got bees again. I had to now learn to deal with the mites and to keep bees in good health to produce honey! After 23 years in the mines I went to construction for a few years then went to work part time for the WVDA in the apiary program that was in 2000 until today. I keep around 200 colonies at the present time and still trying to maintain healthy bees.

Honey Production and Processing/Bee Maladies

Session 3: 2:45 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Presenters: Michael Shamblin and Wade Stiltner

Michael Shamblin, WVU Extension Service Clay County, Agriculture and Natural Resources Extension Agent, Michael.Shamblin@mail.wvu.edu. Michael is a graduate of West Virginia University, receiving his Bachelors of Science in Agriculture in 2001 and Masters of Science in Agriculture Education in 2002. Michael became a beekeeper in 1999 when encouraged by his friend and late colleague Tom McCutcheon, then WVU Extension Agent in Roane County. Tom gave Michael his first bees and his only request in return was that he start someone else. “During the last 15 years, I’ve spoken to “wanna-bee” beekeepers around the state”, said Michael. “I hope I’ve paid Tom for the bees by now”. Michael remains a hobby beekeeper and gardener at his home in Looneyville WV with his wife and 3 children. He has served as the WVU Extension Agent in Clay County for the past 10 years.

Wade Stiltner, WV Department of Agriculture, State Apiarist, wstiltner@wvda.us. Wade grew up in Wayne County WV and attended Buffalo High School. He was an officer in FFA for 4 years. Beekeeping was one of my projects since I lived on a rural small farm we had most all the other farm animals. After graduation I begin working in a lumber mill, got married (41 years) we had 2 children after 7 years at the mill I then went to work underground in the coal mines of eastern KY. Still keeping bees pre-mite era! During that period I was moving from place to place in the coal fields I sold my bees mid-80,s. After I finally settled down and bought my present farm I got bees again. I had to now learn to deal with the mites and to keep bees in good health to produce honey! After 23 years in the mines I went to construction for a few years then went to work part time for the WVDA in the apiary program that was in 2000 until today. I keep around 200 colonies at the present time and still trying to maintain healthy bees.